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Feline Infectious Peritonitis Virus Antigen

$535.33 excl. VAT

Feline Infectious Peritonitis virus antigen has been manufactured for use in the detection of antibodies against feline coronavirus (FIPV; feline coronavirus) for immunoassay development or other applications.

FELINE INFECTIOUS PERITONITIS VIRUS ANTIGEN

Feline Infectious Peritonitis virus antigen has been manufactured for use in the detection of antibodies against feline coronavirus (FIPV; feline coronavirus) for immunoassay development or other applications.

 

PRODUCT DETAILS – FELINE INFECTIOUS PERITONITIS VIRUS ANTIGEN

  • Feline Infectious Peritonitis virus antigen, strain WSU 79-1146.
  • Native antigen purified from FIPV infected CRFK cells.
  • The antigen is presented in 50 mM Glycine Buffer, pH 9.
  • This material has been UV and detergent inactivated (<0.1% CHAPS, <0.01% SDS).
  • Appropriate for ELISA development or other applications.

 

BACKGROUND

Feline coronavirus (FCoV) belong to family Coronaviridae, order Nidovirales, and, together with canine coronavirus (CCoV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TEGV) of pigs, belong to the subfamily Coronavirinae, genus Alphacoronavirus, species Alphacoronavirus 1 (Kipar & Meli, 2014). FCoV infection is very common in cats. Around 40% of the domestic cat population has been infected with FCoV, and this figure increases to 90% in multi-cat households. FCoVs appear to have emerged in the 1950s, possibly due to cross-species transmission, and cats worldwide have now been found to be infected (Tasker, 2018). Natural infections with FCoV are transient in ~70% of cats, but persistent infections occur in ~13% of cats. These persistently infected animals are sometimes referred to as ‘carrier’ or ‘chronically shedding’ cats. FCoVs occur as two pathotypes, which cannot be distinguished serologically or morphologically; feline enteric coronavirus (FECV), defined as the “ubiquitous enteric biotype” and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), the virulent biotype that causes FIP in individual cats.

In a small percentage of cases, FCoV infection results in feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a fatal disease that is a common cause of death in young cats (Tasker, 2018). FIP was first described and named in the 1960’s, when experimental infections of healthy cats with organ material of diseased animals confirmed it as a fatal infectious disease. The likely emergence of FIP in the 20th century is believed to be linked to the evolution of the FCoV alongside CoV of pigs and dogs, the development of virulent FIP virus mutations from enteric FCoV, and the increased popularity of keeping and breeding cats as pets (Kipar & Meli, 2014; Tekes & Thiel, 2016).

 

REFERENCE

  • Kipar A, Meli ML. (2014). Feline infectious peritonitis: still an enigma?. Vet Pathol. 51(2):505–526.
  • Tasker, S. (2018). Diagnosis of Feline Infectious Peritonitis: Update on Evidence Supporting Available Tests. J Feline Med Surg, 20 (3), 228-243.
  • Tekes G, Thiel HJ. Feline Coronaviruses: Pathogenesis of Feline Infectious Peritonitis. Adv Virus Res. 2016;96:193–218.

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