0 Items
Select Page

Human Papillomavirus

Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are globally widespread and are tropic for epithelial cells. Different HPVs display a preference for distinct sites of the body, infecting either cutaneous or mucous membranes. Most HPV infections are asymptomatic or give rise to benign warts.

However, a large subset of HPVs, referred to as high-risk genotypes, can cause infectious lesions that may lead to premalignant and malignant cancers of the genital tract. At least thirteen HPVs are recognised as high-risk genotypes that have been associated with malignant disease.

At the Native Antigen Company, we offer a range of monoclonal antibodies recognising Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes for immunoassay research and development. The range includes matched capture-detection antibody pairs for use in sandwich immunoassays and western blotting.

Human Papillomavirus Background

Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small, non-enveloped, DNA viruses that belong to the family Papillomaviridae.  Over 150 genotypes have been identified to date. which are divided into 5 genera, based on DNA sequencing.

Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are globally widespread and are tropic for epithelial cells. Different HPVs display a preference for distinct sites of the body, infecting either cutaneous or mucous membranes. Most infections, caused by HPVs, are asymptomatic or cause benign warts. Some HPVs cause latent infection which can be re-activated under certain circumstances, such as stress and immunosuppression (McMurray, HR).

However, a large subset of high-risk HPV genotypes can cause infectious lesions that may lead to premalignant and malignant cancers of the genital tract. At least thirteen HPVs are recognised as high-risk genotypes causing malignant disease. The most common high-risk genotypes are HPV 16 and 18, which are frequently associated with cancer of the cervix (Doorbar, J). Transmission of high-risk HPV genotypes occurs via skin-to-skin contact during sexual activity.

In recent years, a successful vaccine has been developed that protects against four HPV strains 6, 11, 16 and 18. Clinical trials suggest that the vaccine prevents pre-cancer caused by HPV 16 and 18 in 99% of cases in young women (WHO).

References

McMurray HR, Nguyen D, Westbrook TF, McAnce DJ. 2001. Biology of human papillomaviruses. Int J Exp Pathol. 2001 Feb;82(1):15-33. Review.

Doorbar J, Egawa N, Griffin H, Kranjec C, Murakami I. Human papillomavirus molecular biology and disease association. 2015. Rev Med Virol. Mar;25 Suppl 1:2-23.

World health organization: Biologicals, Human Papillomavirus

Human Papillomavirus Antibodies

A range of monoclonal antibodies recognising Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes are available for immunoassay research and development. The range includes matched capture-detection antibody pairs for HPV16 and HPV18. These antibodies are suitable for use in sandwich immunoassays and western blotting.

Questions?

Check out our FAQ section for answers to the most frequently asked questions about our website and company.

Zika Prevalence in Suriname – an insight into assay cross-reactivity

A recent study published by Langerak et al tested for the seroprevalence of Zika virus in Suriname populations and evaluated the comparative effectiveness of using a commercial ELISA and a standard Virus Neutralisation Assay. Here we discuss the study, its results,...

What should you call your favourite virus?

The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) meet regularly to ensure the taxonomy of viruses is kept logical and up-to-date in the face of an ever-increasing number of new viruses and genome sequences; discussed in here in Nature. This sometimes results...

Overcoming Zika-Dengue cross-reactivity: the highly specific immunoassays your lab needs

In the global battle against Zika virus, serological cross-reactivity with Dengue is a major challenge for academics, epidemiologists and pharmaceutical companies alike. Novel immunoassays can now overcome this problem and could prove a real game-changer in Zika...

The Right Tools for Rubella

Rubella remains a significant pathogen worldwide, with 100,000 cases of congenital rubella syndrome estimated to occur every year. Vaccines to Rubella are highly safe and have effectively eliminated endemic infection in many developed countries, yet inadequate...

Visualising viral infection with immunofluorescence microscopy

Following the latest immunofluoresence data for our Zika and Dengue antibodies, we’ve invited VRS to write a short blog one of their areas of expertise: The applications of immunofluorescence microscopy in studying viruses.   A lot of what we know about biology...

Get in Touch

We sometimes send exclusive information and offers to our customers - please let us know if you are happy to receive these

4 + 12 =

Live Customer Feedback