0 Items
Select Page

Epstein Barr Virus

The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is one of the most commonly found viruses in humans and is best known for causing infectious mononucleosis (glandular fever). EBV is also associated with particular forms of cancer, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma, gastric cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. About 200,000 cancer cases per year are thought to be attributable to EBV.

The Native Antigen Company have developed recombinant antigens for use in EBV research and assay development.

Epstein Barr Virus Background

Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) is a double-stranded DNA, enveloped virus, with a large genome encoding 200 proteins. Epstein Barr virus, also known as Herpes virus 4 (HHV4), belongs to the gammaherpesvirinae subgroup of the Herpesvirus family.

EBV is widely distributed and is estimated to affect around 90% of the human population. In developing countries, most children contract EBV infection at an early age. In developed countries, primary EBV infection is more common in adolescents and adults. The Epstein-Barr virus is commonly spread from human-to-human through saliva and other body fluids (CDC).

In most cases, EBV Infection is asymptomatic, but some individuals develop infectious mononucleosis, a condition that is generally self-limiting but can cause prolonged fatigue lasting for several months. After primary EBV infection, the virus remains latent and can re-activate under certain circumstances. In immunocompromised patients, EBV infection is associated with various malignancies, autoimmune disease and other chronic and acute illnesses.

Epstein-Barr virus primarily targets B-lymphocytes but is also reported to infect epithelial cells, T-cells, natural killer cells, smooth muscle cells and monocytes (Hutt-Fletcher, L.M.).

Epstein Barr Virus Antigens

The Native Antigen Company has developed and produces recombinant Epstein Barr Virus gp125 antigens using our proprietary mammalian expression system. These antigens are suitable for research and development into Epstein-Barr virus biology and in the development of immunoassays.

Questions?

Check out our FAQ section for answers to the most frequently asked questions about our website and company.

Zika Prevalence in Suriname – an insight into assay cross-reactivity

A recent study published by Langerak et al tested for the seroprevalence of Zika virus in Suriname populations and evaluated the comparative effectiveness of using a commercial ELISA and a standard Virus Neutralisation Assay. Here we discuss the study, its results,...

What should you call your favourite virus?

The International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) meet regularly to ensure the taxonomy of viruses is kept logical and up-to-date in the face of an ever-increasing number of new viruses and genome sequences; discussed in here in Nature. This sometimes results...

Overcoming Zika-Dengue cross-reactivity: the highly specific immunoassays your lab needs

In the global battle against Zika virus, serological cross-reactivity with Dengue is a major challenge for academics, epidemiologists and pharmaceutical companies alike. Novel immunoassays can now overcome this problem and could prove a real game-changer in Zika...

The Right Tools for Rubella

Rubella remains a significant pathogen worldwide, with 100,000 cases of congenital rubella syndrome estimated to occur every year. Vaccines to Rubella are highly safe and have effectively eliminated endemic infection in many developed countries, yet inadequate...

Visualising viral infection with immunofluorescence microscopy

Following the latest immunofluoresence data for our Zika and Dengue antibodies, we’ve invited VRS to write a short blog one of their areas of expertise: The applications of immunofluorescence microscopy in studying viruses.   A lot of what we know about biology...

Get in Touch

We sometimes send exclusive information and offers to our customers - please let us know if you are happy to receive these

5 + 15 =

Live Customer Feedback