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Epstein Barr Virus

The Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is one of the most commonly found viruses in humans and is best known for causing infectious mononucleosis (glandular fever). EBV is also associated with particular forms of cancer, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma, gastric cancer and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. About 200,000 cancer cases per year are thought to be attributable to EBV.

The Native Antigen Company have developed recombinant antigens for use in EBV research and assay development.

Epstein Barr Virus Background

Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) is a double-stranded DNA, enveloped virus, with a large genome encoding 200 proteins. Epstein Barr virus, also known as Herpes virus 4 (HHV4), belongs to the gammaherpesvirinae subgroup of the Herpesvirus family.

EBV is widely distributed and is estimated to affect around 90% of the human population. In developing countries, most children contract EBV infection at an early age. In developed countries, primary EBV infection is more common in adolescents and adults. The Epstein-Barr virus is commonly spread from human-to-human through saliva and other body fluids (CDC).

In most cases, EBV Infection is asymptomatic, but some individuals develop infectious mononucleosis, a condition that is generally self-limiting but can cause prolonged fatigue lasting for several months. After primary EBV infection, the virus remains latent and can re-activate under certain circumstances. In immunocompromised patients, EBV infection is associated with various malignancies, autoimmune disease and other chronic and acute illnesses.

Epstein-Barr virus primarily targets B-lymphocytes but is also reported to infect epithelial cells, T-cells, natural killer cells, smooth muscle cells and monocytes (Hutt-Fletcher, L.M.).

Epstein Barr Virus Antigens

The Native Antigen Company has developed and produces recombinant Epstein Barr Virus gp125 antigens using our proprietary mammalian expression system. These antigens are suitable for research and development into Epstein-Barr virus biology and in the development of immunoassays.

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