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Mouse Anti-MERS Coronavirus Spike (S1) Antibody (3871)

$376.65$945.11 excl. VAT

Mouse anti MERS-CoV Spike S1 (clone 3871) is a monoclonal antibody that is specific for the S1 domain of the spike protein of the MERS coronavirus. This antibody does not cross-react with the SARS Coronavirus and is suitable for use in ELISA and IFA.

MOUSE ANTI-MERS-COV SPIKE S1 ANTIBODY (3871)

Mouse anti MERS-CoV Spike S1 antibody (3871) is a monoclonal antibody that is specific for the S1 domain of the spike protein of the MERS coronavirus. Does not cross-react with the SARS Coronavirus. Antibody is suitable for use in ELISA and IFA.

 

PRODUCT DETAILS – MOUSE ANTI-MERS-COV SPIKE S1 ANTIBODY (3871)

  • Purified preparation consisting of >90% pure mouse monoclonal antibody.
  • Specific for the S1 domain of the spike protein of the MERS coronavirus. Does not cross-react with the SARS Coronavirus.
  • Suitable for use in ELISA and IFA.

 

BACKGROUND

Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus (MERS-CoV), is a newly emerging infectious virus which was first identified in Saudi Arabia in June 2012 (Zaki et al., 2012). Since 2012, MERS-CoV has infected 2,229 humans, including 791 deaths (mortality rate ~35%), in at least 27 countries, including Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Iran, Jordan, Qatar, United Kingdom, United States, China, and Thailand. The virus likely uses bats as its natural host, but and replicates in them without showing clinical signs of disease. Dromedary camels are an intermediate host of MERS-CoV and MES-CoV is able to transmit from camels to camels, which demonstrate high seropositivity to MERS-CoV. Transmission of virus from camels to humans has occurred, by direct contact with MERS-CoV-infected dromedary camels by camel workers (reviewed in Zhou et al., 2018).

MERS-CoV has been added to the WHO Blueprint list of priority viruses that cause public health emergency but still lack efficacious drugs and vaccines (WHO, 2018). The majority of MERS vaccines under development are based on MERS-CoV Spike protein, including full-length S, S1, and receptor-binding domain (RBD) (reviewed in Zhou et al. 2018).

 

REFERENCES

Product datasheet
Safety datasheet